Courses Taught

As of Spring 2022. I’ve taught three undergraduate courses as a sole instructor (Lecturer). Spanning three departments and two institutions, my teaching speaks to my collaborative pedagogical drive and my interdisciplinarity.

DTS 401: Advanced Topics in Diaspora and Transnational Studies: Here and Home: Confronting Family History.

This course was taught in person in Winter 2021 at the University of Toronto, Mississauga. This course was a lot like CJS 392 (see below) in its scope, readings, and structure. There were two main differences. First, this course took a more global look at family history. We included Indigenous and Canadian immigrant perspectives to the course. Second, on the first day of class, students collectively decided on the course assignments, grading weight, due dates, and late-policy. This course was based on lengthy-seminar discussions. Students were able to craft a Term Project with an open topic.

CJS 392: Special Topics in Jewish Studies: Memory, Home, and Family.

This course was taught in person in Fall 2021 at the University of Toronto. This course looked at how scholars, artists, and ordinary people have investigated their family’s history. The seminar’s readings focus on the Jewish diaspora and family history and memory of the Holocaust—but not exclusively. We will take a closer look at the sometimes-blurry line between scholarly research and personal historical self-reflection. This course was based on lengthy-seminar discussions. Students were able to craft a Term Project with an open topic.

HIS 330: Germany from Frederick the Great to the First World War, 1780–1918.

This course was taught online in Summer 2021 at University of Toronto. The course looked at German history from 1780 to 1918. This course was designed to make students think about Germany in a global context—its role in transforming our world. We explored how individuals contributed to or reacted against the dramatic transformations of the nineteenth century. You will learn not only “what happened,” but “what is said to have happened” by applying new historical lenses to familiar events. Students made use of entirely online source collections (like GHDI and Black Central Europe), and hypothes.is and Zotero.

Image of Eriks giving a lecture in a classroom
Image of Eriks giving a lecture at UBC, 2014.

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